merovingian world

James T Palmer on the Early Middle Ages and Other Things

Books

Hagiography CoverEarly Medieval Hagiography, Past Imperfect (Arc-Medieval Press, 2018).

 

 

 

Apoc Cover

Apocalypse and Reform from Late Antiquity to the Middle Ages (London: Routledge, 2018) – with Matthew Gabriele.

Brett Whalen (UNC Chapel Hill): ‘The editors and authors are to be applauded’.

Eyal Poleg (Queen Mary University): ‘In this coherent and impressive collection, each article firmly locates this phenomenon within diverse geo-political, cultural and religious contexts. Appealing to students and academics alike, this volume constitutes an important step in the rehabilitation of the Apocalypse. No longer the confines of historians of religion and radicalism, its editors bring the apocalypse into global history.’

ApocFrontThe Apocalypse in the Early Middle Ages (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2014). [READ Ch. 3]

Wolfram Brandes (MPI, Göttingen): ‘[A] very stimulating book, which will certainly shape the course of research on apocalyptic thinking for a very long time to come’ (American Historical Review).

Richard Emmerson (Flordida State): ‘An impressive accomplishment and an exemplary contribution to our understanding of medieval apocalypticism. It is highly recommended’ (Speculum).

Anne Latowsky (USF): ‘With its unprecedented new take on an age-old question, this book will be essential reading for many, if not all, students of the medieval world’ (Catholic Historical Review).

Frankish World CoverAnglo-Saxons in a Frankish World 690-900, Studies in the Early Middle Ages, 19 (Turnhout: Brepols, 2009).

Charles West (Sheffield): ‘[A] sensitive and methodologically exemplary book’ (The Medieval Review).

Paul Fouracre (Manchester): ‘What he [the author] has done is written a very useful and learned book on the construction of the Anglo-Saxon missionary in hagiography (Early Medieval Europe).

Ian Wood (Leeds): ‘[U]nquestionably a work that one can recommend as a point of departure for understanding the work of the Anglo-Saxons on the continent in the late seventh and eighth centuries’ (Cercles).

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